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“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world.”– Margaret Mead   Individual actions can seem insignificant. You do your part and wonder, “Did this make any difference at all?” And while you might not be able to see exactly how you contributed, do know that you did contribute. Small actions add up. By taking a stand for hope, you act as ...

We believe individual action is powerful, and necessary in changing the hearts of the community. The Help Hope Rise Action Rally was a starting point in spurring individuals to make a commitment to fight hate in every place that it lives. So many people notice the hate all around us, but don’t know where to start in combatting it. This event brought us together as a springboard ...

Hope isn’t wishful thinking—it’s taking action for a better future. In a world where strife, uncertainty and hate grab headlines and inspire fear in the hearts of people across the world, hope is a balm that heals. It’s powerful. It’s critical. Hope is a radical act. Small actions, done by caring individuals, can change the world. But where does one start? How can you get invol ...

History has shown us that intolerance, coupled with silence, produces oppression and violence.

We've seen what can happen when we do not value human dignity—casting out those who flee persecution.

So we cannot remain silent.

 

For International Holocaust Remembrance Day, we are rolling out a new phase in The Butterfly Project's story.  Hatred and intolerance are turning the world into a prison.  To have hope, to practice empathy, to see beauty is to break free. Hope is a protest. A rally cry: “I will this world to be better.” Hope is a powerful statement of solidarity with others. It turns individua ...

HOUSTON, TX (December 7, 2016) -- In a powerful statement issued by an array of Holocaust institutions, scholars and educators from around the world, an alarm is being sounded on the rise of groups that promote intolerance and hate speech. Holocaust Museum Houston is one of more than 91 institutions and 71 individuals calling on lawmakers to condemn white nationalist groups and ...

More than 20 years ago, a group of teachers created a curriculum to teach their students about the atrocities of the Holocaust by making handmade butterflies to represent the 1.5 million children who perished at the hands of the Nazis. Over time, the Holocaust Museum Houston collected 1.5 million of these butterflies and started the Butterfly Project. Sent from Houston across t ...

People visit the Holocaust Museum Houston and ask themselves, “How could this have happened?” How did so many people sit silently while their neighbors were targeted, taunted and taken away? Could it happen again? The Butterfly Project’s goal is to make sure it does not. And it starts with you: When you see a wrong being done, it is your duty to right it. It is your duty to b ...

Work downtown? Take a breakfast or lunch trip to Two Allen Center to see The Butterfly Project exhibit.

View all six of our traveling butterfly displays in one location during this two-week period only.